Macro Awards 2014

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A) Makromolekulares Kolloquium, Freiburg, Germany (February 26-28, 2014)

The Macromolecular Journals sponsored two prizes for the best poster presentations. The prizes were awarded to:

 

a1) Achieving Stimuli-Selective Release of Encapsulated Payloads from Nanocontainers

Roland H. Staff,1 Sarah Wald,1 Markus Gallei,2 Johannes Elbert,2 Matthias Rehahn,2 Katharina Landfester,1 Daniel Crespy*1

1 Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz, Germany; Email: [email protected]

2 Ernst-Berl Institute for Chemical Engineering and Macromolecular Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Germany

Sarah-Wald-and-the-winning-poster-on-nanocontainers-with-a-stimulus-specific-release-of-playloads

Sarah Wald and the winning poster on nanocontainers with a stimulus-specific release of playloads

A stimuli-specific release of encapsulated payloads from nanocontainers is in the field of self-healing materials and drug-delivery of outmost importance. Usually, nanocapsules with a hydrophilic core prepared by inverse miniemulsion have low colloidal stability, display leakage of encapsulated substances due to osmotic pressure, and require a demanding transfer from oil to aqueous continuous phase. Herein, we suggest a new general strategy for the preparation of stable polymer nanocapsules that are resistant to osmotic pressure and responsive to environmental stimuli. The nanocontainers were designed in a way that they allow for a stimulus-specific release in water of one payload, one other co-encapsulated payload, or both together.

 

a2) Tailor-Made Polymeric Bags for Precious Metal Nanoparticles

Ziyin Fan, Andreas Greiner*

Chair for Macromolecular Chemistry II and Bayreuth Center for Colloids and Interfaces, University of Bayreuth, Universitätsstr. 30, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany; Email: [email protected]bayreuth.de, [email protected]

Ziyin Fan and the winning poster on polymeric bags for metal nanoparticles

Ziyin Fan and the winning poster on polymeric bags for metal nanoparticles

Preparation of nanoparticles with precisely defined size and shape is still a challenge. We presented here polymeric bags that were capable to fish gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) within a certain size range. Polymer bound bags of a sulfur containing polymer were prepared by dissolving gold core of an analog AuNP containing hybrid material. The size selective fishing of AuNP has been carried out by using simple biphasic ligand exchange reaction. Citrate stabilized AuNPs ([email protected]) of different sizes were used as “fish”. The polymeric bags caught AuNPs under 15 nm with high efficiency. Using a mixture of [email protected] of different sizes as “fish”, the polymeric bags captured more small “fish” (3 nm) than large “fish” (15 nm) and the oversize “fish” was excluded. The polymeric bags also acted as universal carrier for other precious metal nanoparticles (Ag, Pd, Pt).

 

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B) Europolymer Conference (EUPOC 2014), Gargnano, Italy (May 25-29, 2014)

The Macromolecular Journals sponsored two prizes for the best poster presentations. The prizes were awarded to:

 

b1) Assessing the Assemblies of pH-Responsive Micelles: A Laser Light Scattering Study

Daniel B. Wright,* 1 Joseph P. Patterson,1 Christophe Chassenieux,2 Olivier Colombani,2 Rachel K. O’Reilly 1

1 Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK; Email: [email protected]

2 Département PCI, LUNAM Université, Université du Maine, IMMM UMR CNRS 6283, Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans Cedex 09, France.

Daniel Wright and the winning poster on assemblies of pH-responsive micelles

Daniel Wright and the winning poster on assemblies of pH-responsive micelles

Recently it has been shown for amphiphilic diblock copolymers in aqueous media, that copolymerizing hydrophilic units into the hydrophobic block resulted in reduced interfacial tension between the blocks, and a change in micelle behaviour. In this work, we present a similar approach but through the incorporation of responsive units we are able to selectivly tune the pH induced self-assembly. A series of poly(2-(diethylamino) ethyl methacrylate-co-2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate, P(DEAEMA-co-DMAEMA)-b-PDMAEMA , diblock copolymers were synthesized with varying loadings of DEAEMA. In aqueous solution their aggregation is highly sensitive to stimuli and copolymer composition, by using a laser light scattering; a combination of both dynamic and static, their aggregation can be understood further.

 

b2) Sequence Control in Polymer Chemistry via the Passerini Three Component Reaction

Susanne C. Solleder,*Michael A. R. Meier

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe, Germany; Email: sus[email protected]

Susanne Solleder and the winning poster on sequence control in polymer chemistry

Susanne Solleder and the winning poster on sequence control in polymer chemistry

In recent years, polymer chemistry developed various methods that allow the synthesis of macromolecules with well defined molecular weights and architectures, such as star-shaped polymers, macromolecular brushes, or dendrimers. However, simple methods providing an access to polymers containing tailored and defined monomer sequences are still limited. Within this contribution, a novel approach towards sequence-defined polymers, applying the Passerini three component reaction (Passerini-3CR) and the efficient thiol-ene addition reaction iteratively, is described in order to synthesize sequence-defined oligomers as well as block-copolymers.[1] By the use of an ω-unsaturated aldehyde in the Passerini-3CR, the subsequent thiol-ene addition with 3-mercaptopropionic acid introduces a free carboxylic acid, which allows for the next Passerini-3CR. Applying this approach, it is possible to introduce an individual side chain in each repeat unit by simply using different isocyanides in each Passerini-3CR. Furthermore, this strategy completely avoids the use of protecting groups and activation agents.

[1] S. C. Solleder, M. A. R. Meier, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 711; Angew. Chem. 2014, 126, 729.

 

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C) ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, USA (August 10-14, 2014)

The Macromolecular Journals sponsored two prizes for the best poster presentations. The prizes were awarded to:

 

c1) Perylene Bisimide Macrocycles: From Dimer to Nonamer

Peter Spenst, Vladimir Stepanenko, and Frank Würthner*

Institut für Organische Chemie and Center for Nanosystems Chemistry, Würzburg, Germany, Email: [email protected]; [email protected]

Peter Spenst and the winning poster on perylene bisimide macrocycles

Peter Spenst and the winning poster on perylene bisimide macrocycles

Macrocyclic arrays which are composed of highly organized chromophores play a unique role in chemistry and biology. One of the most exceptional examples in this regard is given by the light-harvesting system of the purple bacteria, in which numerous chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll chromophores are arranged in macrocyclic assemblies by non-covalent interactions. As a consequence of the intriguing functional properties of those dye arrays the interest in the development of artificial counterparts has grown tremendously. Here we present the synthesis of a series of covalent bonded perylene bisimide (PBI) macrocycles with ring sizes of two up to nine PBI dyes which exhibit a well-defined electronic coupling among the dye molecules due to the rigidity of the cyclic systems. These supramolecular macrocycles were self-assembled on a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite surface in a two-dimensional manner which could be confirmed by atomic force microscopy. Furthermore these compounds were used to investigate host-guest phenomena by encapsulating fullerene.

 

c2) Physical Studies on Stimuli-Responsive Iron-Based Hydrogels

Jeffrey T. Auletta,* 1 Gregory J. LeDonne,1 Colin D. Ladd,1 Kai C. Gronborg,1 Hang T. Nguyen,2 David Swigon,2 Anna A. Vainchtein,2 William W. Clark,3 Haitao Liu,1 Tara Y. Meyer1

1 Departments of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260, United States; Email: Jeffrey Auletta <[email protected]>

2 Departments of Mathematics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260, United States

3 Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260, United States

Jeffrey Auletta and the winning poster on stimuli-responsive iron-based hydrogels

Jeffrey Auletta and the winning poster on stimuli-responsive iron-based hydrogels

Electroplastic elastomer hydrogels (EPEHs) are a class of materials whose mechanical properties can be switched reversibly between hard and soft states with the application of an electric potential. Previously, we reported on our first-generation EPEH which utilized the Fe(II)/Fe(III) redox couple to reversibly tune mechanical properties by electrochemically switching iron oxidation states between the strongly-crosslinking Fe(III) and weakly-crosslinking Fe(II). In an effort to better understand the crosslinking mechanism and conversion between hard and soft states, quantitative analysis of iron and carboxylate content was performed, as well as mechanical properties measurements of EPEHs with various mole ratios of Fe(II)/Fe(III). Magnetic susceptibility measurements implicate the formation of iron clusters within the material. Potentiometric titrations were also carried out to investigate iron complex formation and the average coordination number of iron with the coordinating carboxylate groups of the hydrogel. Additionally, graphene oxide (GO) was incorporated as filler and was found to increase the mechanical properties of the material, as well as decrease the conversion time between hard and soft states. 

 

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D) ERC-Grantees Conference, Berlin, Germany (August 28-29, 2014)

The Macromolecular Journals sponsored two prizes for the best poster presentations. The prizes were awarded to:

 

d1) Photopatterning of a Supramolecular Hydrogel Using a Light Triggered Catalyst

Chandan Maity,* Wouter E. Hendriksen, Jan H. van Esch, Rienk Eelkemay

Advanced Soft Matter, Department of Chemical Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft, the Netherlands

Prize winner Chandan Maity (right) together with conference organizer Hans Börner (left) and journal editor Anne Pfisterer (middle)

Prize winner Chandan Maity (right) together with conference organizer Hans Börner (left) and journal editor Anne Pfisterer (middle)

Low molecular weight hydrogels are made insitu, under ambient conditions, by the reaction of two non-assembling building blocks forming the gelator. The rate of gelator formation can be enhanced using catalysis, which has a pronounced effect on the rate of gelation, on fibre morphology and on the macroscopic gel properties.[1] Control over the rate of gelator formation in space should allow control over the spatial distribution of gelator material and properties. Here, we will describe the catalysis by a photochromic compound coupled with visible light illumination to provide the hydrogel from water soluble building blocks at room temperature. The photochromic compound upon irradiation lowers the pH of a solution containing the building blocks via proton dissociation and catalyzes the gelator molecule formation. Photocatalytic gelator formation allows photopatterning of this hydrogel by adopting photolithography to produce a patterned surface using a simple photomask.

[1] (a) J. Boekhoven, J. M. Poolman, C. Maity, F. Li, L. van der Mee, C. B. Minkenberg, E. Mendes, J. H. van Esch, R. Eelkema, Nature Chem. 2013, 5, 433. (b) J. M. Poolman, J. Boekhoven, A. Besselink, A. G. L. Olive, J. H. van Esch, R. Eelkema, Nat. Protocols 2014, 9, 977.

 

d2) Sequence Control in Polymer Chemistry via the Passerini Three Component Reaction

Susanne C. Solleder,*Michael A. R. Meier

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe, Germany; Email: [email protected]

Susanne Solleder and the winning poster on sequence control in polymer chemistry

Susanne Solleder and the winning poster on sequence control in polymer chemistry

In recent years, polymer chemistry developed various methods that allow the synthesis of macromolecules with well defined molecular weights and architectures, such as star-shaped polymers, macromolecular brushes, or dendrimers. However, simple methods providing an access to polymers containing tailored and defined monomer sequences are still limited. Within this contribution, a novel approach towards sequence-defined polymers, applying the Passerini three component reaction (Passerini-3CR) and the efficient thiol-ene addition reaction iteratively, is described in order to synthesize sequence-defined oligomers as well as block-copolymers.[1] By the use of an ω-unsaturated aldehyde in the Passerini-3CR, the subsequent thiol-ene addition with 3-mercaptopropionic acid introduces a free carboxylic acid, which allows for the next Passerini-3CR. Applying this approach, it is possible to introduce an individual side chain in each repeat unit by simply using different isocyanides in each Passerini-3CR. Furthermore, this strategy completely avoids the use of protecting groups and activation agents.

[1] S. C. Solleder, M. A. R. Meier, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 711; Angew. Chem. 2014, 126, 729.

 

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E) Computational Condensed Matter: Advances and Challenges (CompMat 2014), Whitehaven, UK (September 8-9, 2014)

Click here for the conference page.

The Macromolecular Journals sponsored a prize for the best poster presentation. The prize was awarded to:

 

Simulations of colloidal and polymeric gels

G. Chivot ,* A. Lemaitre

Navier Laboratory, University of Paris-Est, 2 allée Kepler, Champs-sur-Marne, France; Email: [email protected]

Guillaume Chivot and the winning poster on colloidal and polymeric gels

Guillaume Chivot and the winning poster on colloidal and polymeric gels

We implement molecular dynamics simulations of patchy particles, that is Brownian particles which present attractive patches on their surfaces. The interaction potential combines a repulsive potential between particle cores and several anisotropic attractive contributions between patches. Patches can be initially fixed on the surfaces of particles, or can be formed dynamically when two particles come within interaction range. We study in details the connection between the potential parameters and the mechanical properties of rods or strings formed using such particles and show how a variety of systems, ranging from attractive colloids to polymeric gels, can be built. For example, we can reproduce the mechanical response of rods formed by sticking together ~1μm PMMA spheres, as studied by Pantina and Furst. Or using long strings of sticky particles we can recover the behaviour of linear semi-flexible polymers and relate the bending coefficient and persistence length to the interaction properties.

 

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F) EFCE Working Party on Polymer Reaction Engineering, San Sebastián, Spain (September 12-14, 2014)

The Macromolecular Journals sponsored a prize for the best oral/poster presentation. The prize was awarded to:

 

The Discrete Element Model of Shear-Induced Coagulation – The Structure of the Resulting Clusters

Martin Kroupa,* Michal Vonka, Juraj Kosek

Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Department of Chemical Engineering, Technicka 5, 166 28 Praha 6, Czech Republic; Email: [email protected]

Discrete Element Model of Shear-Induced Coagulation

Discrete Element Model of Shear-Induced Coagulation

Stabilized colloidal dispersions may be encountered in various products and applications and their behavior under shear is still not completely understood. We used the Discrete Element Method for the dynamic simulations of dispersion systems. The interactions between primary particles were described by the DLVO and JKR theories. The morphology of the resulting clusters was characterized by their size (Rg) and fractal dimension (df). Our model was able to capture the dependence of both Rg and df on the system parameters, including the particle volume fraction. A large value of fractal dimension df indicated dense clusters, which is in agreement with experimental data for shear-induced coagulation from literature. The results of this work provide a theoretical insight into the dynamics of coagulum formation and the structure of the resulting clusters.

 

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G) Polymers and Energy – GDCh-Division of Macromolecular Chemistry, Jena, Germany (September 14-16, 2014)

The Macromolecular Journals sponsored a prize for the best poster presentation. The prize was awarded to:

 

Preparation of Ion- and Temperature Responsive Membranes via Controlled Graft Copolymerization

Martyna Gajda,* Mathias Ulbricht

Lehrstuhl für Technische Chemie II, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 45141 Essen, Germany, Email: [email protected]

Martyna Gajda and the winning poster on responsive membranes

Martyna Gajda and the winning poster on responsive membranes

Stimuli-responsive hydrogels have the unique ability to change their volume upon a small stimulus and therefore they have great potential for applications like chemical sensing and controlled drug delivery. We present here concepts and results for membranes which change the pore size in dependency of temperature, ionic strength or presence of specific ions. For synthesis of such membranes we use two different methods: the reactive pore-filling with a hydrogel, and the grafting of responsive copolymer brushes from the pore walls via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerisation. For both methods we combine here the ion-responsive poly(N,N-dimethyl-N-methacryloyloxyethyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl)ammonium betaine) and the temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) to achieve a copolymer which is sensitive to ions and temperature.

 

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